The Corporation Code of the Philippines 15

THE CORPORATION CODE OF THE PHILIPPINES
[Batas Pambansa Blg. 68]

TITLE XV

FOREIGN CORPORATIONS

Section 123. Definition and rights of foreign corporations. – For the purposes of this Code, a foreign corporation is one formed, organized or existing under any laws other than those of the Philippines and whose laws allow Filipino citizens and corporations to do business in its own country or state. It shall have the right to transact business in the Philippines after it shall have obtained a license to transact business in this country in accordance with this Code and a certificate of authority from the appropriate government agency. (n)

Section 124. Application to existing foreign corporations. – Every foreign corporation which on the date of the effectivity of this Code is authorized to do business in the Philippines under a license therefore issued to it, shall continue to have such authority under the terms and condition of its license, subject to the provisions of this Code and other special laws. (n)

Section 125. Application for a license. – A foreign corporation applying for a license to transact business in the Philippines shall submit to the Securities and Exchange Commission a copy of its articles of incorporation and by-laws, certified in accordance with law, and their translation to an official language of the Philippines, if necessary. The application shall be under oath and, unless already stated in its articles of incorporation, shall specifically set forth the following:

1. The date and term of incorporation;

2. The address, including the street number, of the principal office of the corporation in the country or state of incorporation;

3. The name and address of its resident agent authorized to accept summons and process in all legal proceedings and, pending the establishment of a local office, all notices affecting the corporation;

4. The place in the Philippines where the corporation intends to operate;

5. The specific purpose or purposes which the corporation intends to pursue in the transaction of its business in the Philippines: Provided, That said purpose or purposes are those specifically stated in the certificate of authority issued by the appropriate government agency;

6. The names and addresses of the present directors and officers of the corporation;

7. A statement of its authorized capital stock and the aggregate number of shares which the corporation has authority to issue, itemized by classes, par value of shares, shares without par value, and series, if any;

8. A statement of its outstanding capital stock and the aggregate number of shares which the corporation has issued, itemized by classes, par value of shares, shares without par value, and series, if any;

9. A statement of the amount actually paid in; and

10. Such additional information as may be necessary or appropriate in order to enable the Securities and Exchange Commission to determine whether such corporation is entitled to a license to transact business in the Philippines, and to determine and assess the fees payable.

Attached to the application for license shall be a duly executed certificate under oath by the authorized official or officials of the jurisdiction of its incorporation, attesting to the fact that the laws of the country or state of the applicant allow Filipino citizens and corporations to do business therein, and that the applicant is an existing corporation in good standing. If such certificate is in a foreign language, a translation thereof in English under oath of the translator shall be attached thereto.

The application for a license to transact business in the Philippines shall likewise be accompanied by a statement under oath of the president or any other person authorized by the corporation, showing to the satisfaction of the Securities and Exchange Commission and other governmental agency in the proper cases that the applicant is solvent and in sound financial condition, and setting forth the assets and liabilities of the corporation as of the date not exceeding one (1) year immediately prior to the filing of the application.

Foreign banking, financial and insurance corporations shall, in addition to the above requirements, comply with the provisions of existing laws applicable to them. In the case of all other foreign corporations, no application for license to transact business in the Philippines shall be accepted by the Securities and Exchange Commission without previous authority from the appropriate government agency, whenever required by law. (68a)

Section 126. Issuance of a license. – If the Securities and Exchange Commission is satisfied that the applicant has complied with all the requirements of this Code and other special laws, rules and regulations, the Commission shall issue a license to the applicant to transact business in the Philippines for the purpose or purposes specified in such license. Upon issuance of the license, such foreign corporation may commence to transact business in the Philippines and continue to do so for as long as it retains its authority to act as a corporation under the laws of the country or state of its incorporation, unless such license is sooner surrendered, revoked, suspended or annulled in accordance with this Code or other special laws.

Within sixty (60) days after the issuance of the license to transact business in the Philippines, the license, except foreign banking or insurance corporation, shall deposit with the Securities and Exchange Commission for the benefit of present and future creditors of the licensee in the Philippines, securities satisfactory to the Securities and Exchange Commission, consisting of bonds or other evidence of indebtedness of the Government of the Philippines, its political subdivisions and instrumentalities, or of government-owned or controlled corporations and entities, shares of stock in “registered enterprises” as this term is defined in Republic Act No. 5186, shares of stock in domestic corporations registered in the stock exchange, or shares of stock in domestic insurance companies and banks, or any combination of these kinds of securities, with an actual market value of at least one hundred thousand (P100,000.) pesos; Provided, however, That within six (6) months after each fiscal year of the licensee, the Securities and Exchange Commission shall require the licensee to deposit additional securities equivalent in actual market value to two (2%) percent of the amount by which the licensee’s gross income for that fiscal year exceeds five million (P5,000,000.00) pesos. The Securities and Exchange Commission shall also require deposit of additional securities if the actual market value of the securities on deposit has decreased by at least ten (10%) percent of their actual market value at the time they were deposited. The Securities and Exchange Commission may at its discretion release part of the additional securities deposited with it if the gross income of the licensee has decreased, or if the actual market value of the total securities on deposit has increased, by more than ten (10%) percent of the actual market value of the securities at the time they were deposited. The Securities and Exchange Commission may, from time to time, allow the licensee to substitute other securities for those already on deposit as long as the licensee is solvent. Such licensee shall be entitled to collect the interest or dividends on the securities deposited. In the event the licensee ceases to do business in the Philippines, the securities deposited as aforesaid shall be returned, upon the licensee’s application therefor and upon proof to the satisfaction of the Securities and Exchange Commission that the licensee has no liability to Philippine residents, including the Government of the Republic of the Philippines. (n)

Section 127. Who may be a resident agent. – A resident agent may be either an individual residing in the Philippines or a domestic corporation lawfully transacting business in the Philippines: Provided, That in the case of an individual, he must be of good moral character and of sound financial standing. (n)

Section 128. Resident agent; service of process. – The Securities and Exchange Commission shall require as a condition precedent to the issuance of the license to transact business in the Philippines by any foreign corporation that such corporation file with the Securities and Exchange Commission a written power of attorney designating some person who must be a resident of the Philippines, on whom any summons and other legal processes may be served in all actions or other legal proceedings against such corporation, and consenting that service upon such resident agent shall be admitted and held as valid as if served upon the duly authorized officers of the foreign corporation at its home office. Any such foreign corporation shall likewise execute and file with the Securities and Exchange Commission an agreement or stipulation, executed by the proper authorities of said corporation, in form and substance as follows:

“The (name of foreign corporation) does hereby stipulate and agree, in consideration of its being granted by the Securities and Exchange Commission a license to transact business in the Philippines, that if at any time said corporation shall cease to transact business in the Philippines, or shall be without any resident agent in the Philippines on whom any summons or other legal processes may be served, then in any action or proceeding arising out of any business or transaction which occurred in the Philippines, service of any summons or other legal process may be made upon the Securities and Exchange Commission and that such service shall have the same force and effect as if made upon the duly-authorized officers of the corporation at its home office.”

Whenever such service of summons or other process shall be made upon the Securities and Exchange Commission, the Commission shall, within ten (10) days thereafter, transmit by mail a copy of such summons or other legal process to the corporation at its home or principal office. The sending of such copy by the Commission shall be necessary part of and shall complete such service. All expenses incurred by the Commission for such service shall be paid in advance by the party at whose instance the service is made.

In case of a change of address of the resident agent, it shall be his or its duty to immediately notify in writing the Securities and Exchange Commission of the new address. (72a; and n)

Section 129. Law applicable. – Any foreign corporation lawfully doing business in the Philippines shall be bound by all laws, rules and regulations applicable to domestic corporations of the same class, except such only as provide for the creation, formation, organization or dissolution of corporations or those which fix the relations, liabilities, responsibilities, or duties of stockholders, members, or officers of corporations to each other or to the corporation. (73a)

Section 130. Amendments to articles of incorporation or by-laws of foreign corporations. – Whenever the articles of incorporation or by-laws of a foreign corporation authorized to transact business in the Philippines are amended, such foreign corporation shall, within sixty (60) days after the amendment becomes effective, file with the Securities and Exchange Commission, and in the proper cases with the appropriate government agency, a duly authenticated copy of the articles of incorporation or by-laws, as amended, indicating clearly in capital letters or by underscoring the change or changes made, duly certified by the authorized official or officials of the country or state of incorporation. The filing thereof shall not of itself enlarge or alter the purpose or purposes for which such corporation is authorized to transact business in the Philippines. (n)

Section 131. Amended license. – A foreign corporation authorized to transact business in the Philippines shall obtain an amended license in the event it changes its corporate name, or desires to pursue in the Philippines other or additional purposes, by submitting an application therefor to the Securities and Exchange Commission, favorably endorsed by the appropriate government agency in the proper cases. (n)

Section 132. Merger or consolidation involving a foreign corporation licensed in the Philippines. – One or more foreign corporations authorized to transact business in the Philippines may merge or consolidate with any domestic corporation or corporations if such is permitted under Philippine laws and by the law of its incorporation: Provided, That the requirements on merger or consolidation as provided in this Code are followed.

Whenever a foreign corporation authorized to transact business in the Philippines shall be a party to a merger or consolidation in its home country or state as permitted by the law of its incorporation, such foreign corporation shall, within sixty (60) days after such merger or consolidation becomes effective, file with the Securities and Exchange Commission, and in proper cases with the appropriate government agency, a copy of the articles of merger or consolidation duly authenticated by the proper official or officials of the country or state under the laws of which merger or consolidation was effected: Provided, however, That if the absorbed corporation is the foreign corporation doing business in the Philippines, the latter shall at the same time file a petition for withdrawal of it license in accordance with this Title. (n)

Section 133. Doing business without a license. – No foreign corporation transacting business in the Philippines without a license, or its successors or assigns, shall be permitted to maintain or intervene in any action, suit or proceeding in any court or administrative agency of the Philippines; but such corporation may be sued or proceeded against before Philippine courts or administrative tribunals on any valid cause of action recognized under Philippine laws. (69a)

Section 134. Revocation of license. – Without prejudice to other grounds provided by special laws, the license of a foreign corporation to transact business in the Philippines may be revoked or suspended by the Securities and Exchange Commission upon any of the following grounds:

1. Failure to file its annual report or pay any fees as required by this Code;

2. Failure to appoint and maintain a resident agent in the Philippines as required by this Title;

3. Failure, after change of its resident agent or of his address, to submit to the Securities and Exchange Commission a statement of such change as required by this Title;

4. Failure to submit to the Securities and Exchange Commission an authenticated copy of any amendment to its articles of incorporation or by-laws or of any articles of merger or consolidation within the time prescribed by this Title;

5. A misrepresentation of any material matter in any application, report, affidavit or other document submitted by such corporation pursuant to this Title;

6. Failure to pay any and all taxes, imposts, assessments or penalties, if any, lawfully due to the Philippine Government or any of its agencies or political subdivisions;

7. Transacting business in the Philippines outside of the purpose or purposes for which such corporation is authorized under its license;

8. Transacting business in the Philippines as agent of or acting for and in behalf of any foreign corporation or entity not duly licensed to do business in the Philippines; or

9. Any other ground as would render it unfit to transact business in the Philippines. (n)

Section 135. Issuance of certificate of revocation. – Upon the revocation of any such license to transact business in the Philippines, the Securities and Exchange Commission shall issue a corresponding certificate of revocation, furnishing a copy thereof to the appropriate government agency in the proper cases.

The Securities and Exchange Commission shall also mail to the corporation at its registered office in the Philippines a notice of such revocation accompanied by a copy of the certificate of revocation. (n)

Section 136. Withdrawal of foreign corporations. – Subject to existing laws and regulations, a foreign corporation licensed to transact business in the Philippines may be allowed to withdraw from the Philippines by filing a petition for withdrawal of license. No certificate of withdrawal shall be issued by the Securities and Exchange Commission unless all the following requirements are met;

1. All claims which have accrued in the Philippines have been paid, compromised or settled;

2. All taxes, imposts, assessments, and penalties, if any, lawfully due to the Philippine Government or any of its agencies or political subdivisions have been paid; and

3. The petition for withdrawal of license has been published once a week for three (3) consecutive weeks in a newspaper of general circulation in the Philippines.

The Corporation Code of the Philippines
TITLE I General Provisions
TITLE II Incorporation and Organization of Private Corporations
TITLE III Board of Directors Trustees Officers
TITLE IV Powers of Corporations
TITLE V By Laws
TITLE VI Meetings
TITLE VII Stocks and Stockholders
TITLE VIII Corporate Books and Records
TITLE IX Merger and Consolidation
TITLE X Appraisal Right
TITLE XI Non-Stock Corporations
TITLE XII Close Corporations
TITLE XIII Special Corporations
TITLE XIV Dissolution
TITLE XV Foreign Corporations
TITLE XVI Miscellaneous Provisions

The Corporation Code of the Philippines 5

THE CORPORATION CODE OF THE PHILIPPINES
[Batas Pambansa Blg. 68]

TITLE V

BY LAWS

Section 46. Adoption of by-laws. – Every corporation formed under this Code must, within one (1) month after receipt of official notice of the issuance of its certificate of incorporation by the Securities and Exchange Commission, adopt a code of by-laws for its government not inconsistent with this Code. For the adoption of by-laws by the corporation the affirmative vote of the stockholders representing at least a majority of the outstanding capital stock, or of at least a majority of the members in case of non-stock corporations, shall be necessary. The by-laws shall be signed by the stockholders or members voting for them and shall be kept in the principal office of the corporation, subject to the inspection of the stockholders or members during office hours. A copy thereof, duly certified to by a majority of the directors or trustees countersigned by the secretary of the corporation, shall be filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission which shall be attached to the original articles of incorporation.

Notwithstanding the provisions of the preceding paragraph, by-laws may be adopted and filed prior to incorporation; in such case, such by-laws shall be approved and signed by all the incorporators and submitted to the Securities and Exchange Commission, together with the articles of incorporation.

In all cases, by-laws shall be effective only upon the issuance by the Securities and Exchange Commission of a certification that the by-laws are not inconsistent with this Code.

The Securities and Exchange Commission shall not accept for filing the by-laws or any amendment thereto of any bank, banking institution, building and loan association, trust company, insurance company, public utility, educational institution or other special corporations governed by special laws, unless accompanied by a certificate of the appropriate government agency to the effect that such by-laws or amendments are in accordance with law. (20a)

Section 47. Contents of by-laws. – Subject to the provisions of the Constitution, this Code, other special laws, and the articles of incorporation, a private corporation may provide in its by-laws for:

1. The time, place and manner of calling and conducting regular or special meetings of the directors or trustees;

2. The time and manner of calling and conducting regular or special meetings of the stockholders or members;

3. The required quorum in meetings of stockholders or members and the manner of voting therein;

4. The form for proxies of stockholders and members and the manner of voting them;

5. The qualifications, duties and compensation of directors or trustees, officers and employees;

6. The time for holding the annual election of directors of trustees and the mode or manner of giving notice thereof;

7. The manner of election or appointment and the term of office of all officers other than directors or trustees;

8. The penalties for violation of the by-laws;

9. In the case of stock corporations, the manner of issuing stock certificates; and

10. Such other matters as may be necessary for the proper or convenient transaction of its corporate business and affairs. (21a)

Section 48. Amendments to by-laws. – The board of directors or trustees, by a majority vote thereof, and the owners of at least a majority of the outstanding capital stock, or at least a majority of the members of a non-stock corporation, at a regular or special meeting duly called for the purpose, may amend or repeal any by-laws or adopt new by-laws. The owners of two-thirds (2/3) of the outstanding capital stock or two-thirds (2/3) of the members in a non-stock corporation may delegate to the board of directors or trustees the power to amend or repeal any by-laws or adopt new by-laws: Provided, That any power delegated to the board of directors or trustees to amend or repeal any by-laws or adopt new by-laws shall be considered as revoked whenever stockholders owning or representing a majority of the outstanding capital stock or a majority of the members in non-stock corporations, shall so vote at a regular or special meeting.

Whenever any amendment or new by-laws are adopted, such amendment or new by-laws shall be attached to the original by-laws in the office of the corporation, and a copy thereof, duly certified under oath by the corporate secretary and a majority of the directors or trustees, shall be filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission the same to be attached to the original articles of incorporation and original by-laws.

The amended or new by-laws shall only be effective upon the issuance by the Securities and Exchange Commission of a certification that the same are not inconsistent with this Code. (22a and 23a)

The Corporation Code of the Philippines
TITLE I General Provisions
TITLE II Incorporation and Organization of Private Corporations
TITLE III Board of Directors Trustees Officers
TITLE IV Powers of Corporations
TITLE V By Laws
TITLE VI Meetings
TITLE VII Stocks and Stockholders
TITLE VIII Corporate Books and Records
TITLE IX Merger and Consolidation
TITLE X Appraisal Right
TITLE XI Non-Stock Corporations
TITLE XII Close Corporations
TITLE XIII Special Corporations
TITLE XIV Dissolution
TITLE XV Foreign Corporations
TITLE XVI Miscellaneous Provisions

BOI Philippines Board of Investments

The Philippines’ Board of Investments (BOI) operates under the authority of the Department of Trade and Industry (DTI). The BOI is the leading government agency for promoting local and foreign investments in the Philippines. By focusing on globally competitive industries, the BOI’s aim is to stimulate economic prosperity and employment for the country. The agency promotes the sustainable use of the state’s resources and the cooperation of the government with private investors through preferred areas of business which are published once a year in the Investment Priorities Plan (IPP). The IPP is drawn up  by an inter-agency delegation and approved by the President; it lists specific areas of activities which qualify a business for incentives.

Projects registered with the BOI can avail from fiscal incentives and tax breaks:

•Income Tax Holiday *
•Exemption From Wharf Dues and Export Tax, Duty, Impost and Fees
•Exemption From Taxes and Duties on Imported Spare Parts
•Tax Exemption on Breeding Stocks and Genetic Materials
•Tax Credits
•Additional Deductions from Taxable Income

* 3 to 8 years of Income Tax Holiday and 4 to 6 years of local business tax exemption respectively for non-pioneer and pioneer industries.

There are different requirements for pioneer and non-pioneer industries.

•  Pioneer industries: 100% foreign owned companies are entitled to incentives if:

◊ at least 70% of their services/products are intended for export, or
◊ its projects are undertaken in less-developed areas of the Philippines as listed by the BOI.

These enterprises are required to attain 60% Filipino-ownership within 30 years of registration  with the BOI unless they are exporting or intend to export 100% of their services/production.

•  Non-pioneer industries: Foreign ownership is limited to 40%, unless 70% of the  annual production is exported.

Incentives may still be granted to businesses whose activity is not included in the IPP, under one of these conditions:

1) The enterprise is at least 60% Filipino-owned  and 50% or more of the services/products are intended for export , or

2) The company is more than 40%  foreign-owned and 70% or more of the services/products is intended for export.

Note: Outsourcing, Back Office, Call Centers, BPO, KPO, LPO and FPO activities are considered 100% export.

For all local and foreign companies wishing to register at the BOI, Dayanan Philippines Business Consultancy will:

– Ascertain if your  business qualifies for BOI incentives
– Assist in finding a BOI approved location
– Prepare  and submit of all the required documents  for Philippines BOI registration